Insurance coverage

Smoking, Insurance Coverage View link in Those with Mental Health Disorders, SOUTH

The objective of the study was to estimate recent trends in cigarette smoking and health insurance coverage for American adults with and without mental health and SUD.

The analysis demonstrates improvement among study participants who included a nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized respondents aged 18-64.

Results of a recent analysis showed that improved smoking abstinence outcomes among adults in the United States with mental and substance use disorders (SUDs) are strongly related to increased health insurance coverage.

The objective of the study was to estimate recent trends in cigarette smoking and health insurance coverage for American adults with and without mental health and SUD.

Investigators reviewed an event study analysis of insurance and smoking trends among American adults with and without mental health or SUD disorders using public-use data from 2008 to 2019 from the national survey on drug use and health, which is an annual cross-sectional survey. investigation.

Participants included a nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized respondents aged 18-64.

The outcome variables were a measure of health insurance coverage in the previous year and 3 measures of recent cigarette smoking. The research team compared results between individuals with and without mental health or SUD disorders and over time.

The results showed that when comparing pooled data between 2008 and 2009 and between 2018 and 2019, smoking rates of adults with mental health disorders and SUD decreased from 37.9% to 27.9%, while that smoking rates for adults without mental health or SUD disorders decreased to 16.3% from 21.4%.

Additionally, recent smoking abstinence rates among adults with mental health conditions or SUDs increased from 7.4% to 10.9%, while recent smoking abstinence rates without mental health disorders or TUS fell from 9.6% to 12%.

Between 2018 and 2019, 11% of net reductions in current smoking, 12% of net reductions in daily smoking, and 12% of net increases in recent smoking abstinence coincided with larger gains in insurance coverage for adults with a mental disorder or SUD compared to those without a mental health disorder or SUD.

Reference

Creedon TB, Wayne GF, Progovac AM, Levy DE, Cook BL. Trends in Cigarette Smoking and Health Insurance Coverage Among American Adults with Mental Disorders and Substance Abuse. Addiction. 2022.doi:10.1111/add.16052